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Accidentally Broke Metal Brake Line on Rear Passenger Side

Audi A6 The mid-sized Audi A6 model offers more room to the driver and passengers over the A4 line.

Accidentally Broke Metal Brake Line on Rear Passenger Side

  #1  
Old 08-25-2018, 10:47 PM
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Default Accidentally Broke Metal Brake Line on Rear Passenger Side

I was performing routine Brake Maintenance (Replaced Pads, Rotors, as well as the Caliper on the Rear Passenger Side, New Brake Fluid and Brake Hoses), Wagon currently at 175,000 Miles

As I was trying to loosen the nut (from the end of the Hard Metal Brake Line in order to remove the old brake hose), the metal started fatiguing, twisted, and broke off See picture attached






Its virtually impossible to even attach a temporary compression fitting to drive the vehicle to the nearest shop; would need to call a tow truck, don't want to risk damage the Master Brake Cylinder or even myself

Does anyone have a brake line diagram for an Audi A6 C5 2004 Quattro Avant 3.0L?

Would I have to replace the entire line running from the ABS sensor to the rear Passenger Side? How much should / would it approximately cost?

Can anyone suggest a reputable / reliable shop in New York? Is the dealership an exception?

Please let me know, thank you
 
  #2  
Old 08-26-2018, 01:26 AM
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I dont have a diagram but i did want to suggest never using a compression fitting on brake line. transmission line its okay brake lines they should never be used... If it were me id follow the line back a little ways from the break and cut it off clean then use a double flare tool and some fittings and a coupler/union fitting to make the repair. This fix done yourself would cost no more then 30 bucks and thats even if you have to buy the double flare tool. price for fittings and union only would be like 10 bucks tops. If you can change brakes and so on this would be easy enough to do yourself
 
  #3  
Old 08-26-2018, 06:03 AM
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Thanks, the metal brake line flexes in such a way, that on my end, it can't just simply be pulled out as there are obstructions in the way such as the exhaust, shocks, subframe, and chassis. I can remove the fender covers though (visually-seeing, T25 fasteners).

Originally Posted by europeancarguy View Post
I dont have a diagram but i did want to suggest never using a compression fitting on brake line. transmission line its okay brake lines they should never be used... If it were me id follow the line back a little ways from the break and cut it off clean then use a double flare tool and some fittings and a coupler/union fitting to make the repair. This fix done yourself would cost no more then 30 bucks and thats even if you have to buy the double flare tool. price for fittings and union only would be like 10 bucks tops. If you can change brakes and so on this would be easy enough to do yourself
 
  #4  
Old 08-26-2018, 06:17 AM
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Also, seems like these Audi's, or any other European car for the matter uses bubble-flare, not double flare

Brake lines for BMW?s and E30?s: the Bubble flare not the Double flare | RTS - Your Total BMW Enthusiast

This video helps too, but for double-flare

Also, my metal brake line broke too close to where it inserts into the flexible brake hose. Is there a kit or way to buy the threaded part in order to fit and secure into the brake hose?
 
  #5  
Old 08-26-2018, 11:13 AM
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you can buy the threaded fittings and a a short length of brake line and union to make the repair in most case, as far as double flare vs bubble flare,, when you go to make a double flare, half way through the process you will notice that you actually have a bubble flare until you do the last step which is pushing back in on the bubble to make a double flare. Anyhow you can make a bubble flare using a double flare tool
 
  #6  
Old 08-27-2018, 08:51 AM
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Is it possible to make that bubble flare ends with the metal hard line still attached in the vehicle? As per the picture, I need to shave off just a small fraction of the damaged part in order make this work. However, I hear you need to make a perfect cut perpendicular to the line when making the bubble flare. Please let me know, thanks again


Originally Posted by europeancarguy View Post
you can buy the threaded fittings and a a short length of brake line and union to make the repair in most case, as far as double flare vs bubble flare,, when you go to make a double flare, half way through the process you will notice that you actually have a bubble flare until you do the last step which is pushing back in on the bubble to make a double flare. Anyhow you can make a bubble flare using a double flare tool
 
  #7  
Old 09-01-2018, 10:53 AM
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I opted for the Bubble Flare instead of replacing the whole line which would have costed over $3K alone (removal of fuel tank, rear differential, welded exhaust line, resonators, etc.)

Thus video helps tremendously

 
  #8  
Old 09-02-2018, 08:09 PM
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Can you verify with me if this is a compression fitting or union connection? This very much look like a compression fitting which is illegal and is unsafe. Please let me know, thank you




Originally Posted by europeancarguy View Post
you can buy the threaded fittings and a a short length of brake line and union to make the repair in most case, as far as double flare vs bubble flare,, when you go to make a double flare, half way through the process you will notice that you actually have a bubble flare until you do the last step which is pushing back in on the bubble to make a double flare. Anyhow you can make a bubble flare using a double flare tool



 
Attached Thumbnails Accidentally Broke Metal Brake Line on Rear Passenger Side-img-1850.jpg  
  #9  
Old 09-03-2018, 02:02 PM
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Sorry for the late reply i have been on 12 hr shifts and havent been online. first off you can make the flare while still attached to the car but yes you do have to make that cut like perfect so it maybe tuff with the line still attached to the car. as for the compression fitting yes thats a compression fitting a union fitting would just have a threaded fitting screwed in from each side of it. sorry if i missed anything but i will check again later to see if you have any other questions or concerns. And yes compression fittings are very unsafe i wouldnt use them at all.
 
  #10  
Old 09-03-2018, 02:50 PM
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I had another thought about that fitting you had shown in the pic, it looks like a compression fitting but if you unscrew the ends and the lines going into each side are bubble flared then it could be that its being used as a union for bubble flared lines( not typical but possible) which would be safe. if you unscrew the end caps and the lines are cut off straight at the ends and there are brass ball pieces that look kinda smashed onto the lines from both sides it for sure a compression fitting set up which is unsafe. To cut brake lines you need a tube cutter and you have to spin it around the brake line and keep tightening it as you go, the problem with the line being in the car still is it makes it very hard at times to get the room to spin this tool around the line and even with a tube cutter the cuts dont always come out perfectly straight. the main thing is dont bend or flex the line to much while attempting this or you may break /kink the line and cause further damage to it. if you can make the bubble flare and reattach it as is with out having to add new line to it thats great, but if you follow the line back further from your connection point and find a section of the brake line that it easier to access and has more room to work id cut the line at that point do double flare and connect with a standard union fitting then shape it to go back to your original connection point and put it together there. you can buy various lengths of brake lines and you can get a brake line with the bubble flare at one end to connect back into the rubber hose and on the other end it has a double flare you would connect to your union fitting( thats if you decided to replace a larger section of the line).... what ever you do just make sure if you are doing a double flare or bubble flare you put your threaded fitting on the line first then make the flare or else you would have a line thats flared and no way to connect it back into the union or rubber hose lol trust me ive been in a hurry at times and have forgotten to put the fitting on first then made the flare and of course had to re cut it and do it all over again because of not putting that fitting on 1st lol it happens.
 

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